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millership large prints
  Looking for some unique gifts for Christmas and wanting to shop local or support the museum while we have to remain closed? We are introducing a click and collect service for our popular Millership range.     All orders can be emailed to the museum with a mobile number so we can send you a payment link. Collection can be any time staff are onsite and set up by arrangement to suit you. Last day for collection will be 19th December.   The Shop will be open for broswing and shopping on Saturday 12th and Saturday 19th from 10.30am to 2pmThe...
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Exciting news- we'll be open again from next Thursday, the 30th of July! We’re working hard and are nearly ready to welcome you back to the museum from Thursday 30th July and we can’t wait to open our doors again. For now we just wanted to tell you about how things will be when we open. We’ll review these procedures as we go along to make sure they are working and welcome any feedback. We are COVID secure and everything we can do has been done to keep us and you safe. We clean every morning, and high-touch areas like the toilets,...
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“The best way to not feel hopeless is to get up and do something. Don’t wait for good things to happen to you. If you go out and make some good things happen, you will fill the world with hope, you will fill yourself with hope.” ― Barack Obama   On the evening of 6th June, towards the end of this year’s Volunteers’ Week, I had the privilege of attending the Erewash Museum Volunteer Party and Awards. As ever, it was a roomful of happy people celebrating what the museum has achieved – and what it can only achieve through the...
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For Local and Community History Month our volunteer researcher Paul Parkin has been delving into the history of Dalby House, the site of the museum, and the people who lived here.  The Agard Family, 1783–1806 The first family (on record) that lived here was the Agard family. In 1783 Mary Agard (nee Bourne) inherited the “copyhold” for the house. At that time the building was not yet known as Dalby House. Copyhold is an ancient form of land tenure in which the property is held “at the will of the Lord according to the custom of the manor”. The Lord...
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posy ring close up
  A ring is one of the major tokens of love - given at engagements, weddings or just as a gift - and has been regarded so for centuries. From the medieval era onwards special rings called posy rings were given to lovers and sometimes friends to express affection. They remained popular in England and France until the 17th century. They are usually engraved with a message of love inside a golden, or gilt,  band. The name posy (or posey) is from the word for poetry, or in French poésie. These messages are carved on the inside and remained concealed...
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Albert Ball is one of the most famous fighter pilots in British History. A World War One hero, aerial ace and winner of the Victoria Cross, Albert had a celebrity-like following across the Nation. But Albert was also local boy, Nottingham born and bred, and educated in Erewash at Long Eaton’s Trent College. Albert’s early life was comfortable. His father, also called Albert, was a successful businessman who started life as a plumber and ended knighted and Lord Mayor of Nottingham. His father indulged his love of engines and machines: Albert had a garden shed where he could tinker away. He...
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members of the legion in the exhibition
One hundred years on from the armistice that ended it all, this week the museum proudly opened its new exhibition, ‘Erewash Remembers: 100 Years of Commemorating the First World War’. Curated by Kate Crossley-Halls, the exhibition turns not only to the conflict itself but also to its devastating aftermath and the cultures of remembrance that grew out of unthinkable international catastrophe. Global war had very local ramifications, and in towns like Ilkeston huge labour shortages were caused when men went away to the Front, many of which were filled by women. Following the armistice of November 11th, 1918, the struggles were...
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Erewash Museum is currently undertaking conservation work on the Hope Robinson letters – an archive of more than 2,000 letters that give an emotional insight into the lives of families of British prisoners of war (POWs) during the Second World War.   In 1944, Hope Robinson was a 29-year-old deputy registrar at Ilkeston Registry Office and was desperate for news of her husband Paul Maltby Robinson, a Major with the Sherwood Foresters, who had been captured by the Japanese forces a few years earlier.   She broke Whitehall regulations to interview two repatriated former POWs and produced a pamphlet about life...
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Ellie in front of blue door
Hi, my name is Ellie Mitchell and I’ll be writing the occasional blog post for the museum, as well as working with Sarah on a bigger project centred on local women’s history (which is hopefully coming soon). I’m a final year English Literature student at the University of Nottingham and I’m currently writing my final essay on D H Lawrence, which is what brings me to the museum and to an area so full of literary history. Some of the most interesting parts of Lawrence’s writing aren’t actually the sex scenes (contrary to popular opinion), but the incredible social realism and...
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image of hermits cave in Dale
The Legend of the Hermit of Dependale The small village of Dale Abbey has, as the name would suggest, originally a religious settlement. There are no records to explain how this history began, and the founding of the Abbey at Dale Abbey are steeped in myth. There is only one manuscript giving a history of the foundation: the Dale Chronicle, written by ‘Thomas de Muscam’ probably in the 13th Century. The only surviving copy of this manuscript is bound into the back of a later document, a Chartulary (or register) of the Abbey from the early 14th Century, now held in...
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Sarah Dara young woman in grey stands in front of fountains
Sarah our student intern from University of Nottingham writes She enters through the main door, its stained glass windows reflecting the sunlight. Walking through the hallway, she's transported to the 1950's; a sweetshop appears, decorated with brightly coloured wrappers coating the larger chocolate of the past. Her eyes widen as she looks at the candy canes leaning in the tall jars and the round sweets glittering appetizingly. Before she gets even more excited, she reminds herself that they're not real. Only if they were though. Another few steps and she arrives in the Lally Gallery; there is something interactive about this...
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coal miners of Manners Colliery Cricket club players celebration photo 1898
Coal was one of the main reasons Britain’s industries developed quicker than any others’ during the Industrial Revolution. At coal mining’s peak in 1913, this industry consisted of about 2600 mines, producing 287 million tons of coal per year and employing a million people. The history of Erewash and surrounding areas is tied to coal to an extent easy to under-estimate today. Mining communities in the area were tight-knit: many collieries had their own sports teams, and miner’s brass bands were common. The Ilkeston Miner’s Welfare club opened in 1924, standing on the corner of Bristol Road and Manners Road; offering...
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bennerley from 1900s
Bennerley Viaduct is an extremely important local historical monument which the local community hold close to their hearts. In 2016 we hosted an exhibition telling the story about its fascinating history and how it relates closely to the historical development of Ilkeston and the Erewash Valley.  This has been very worthwhile and made many more people aware of the great heritage assets they have on their doorstep. Sustrans’ proposal to restore Bennerley Viaduct and make it publically accessible by building ramps and paths up to it and across is very popular in the local community. By bringing the viaduct into use...
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image of toton sidings railway lines
We are pleased to announce that we are working with Long Eaton and District 50+ Forum for their “Toton Sidings Remembered” Project The Heritage Lottery Fund (HLF) have awarded £9,600 to the Forum to work for 18 months with The Erewash Museum and local schools to revive memories of this amazing local heritage, once the largest railway marshalling yard in Europe handling 2 million wagons a year. The project management group includes Pete Wearn and David Farley from the forum, local railway enthusiasts Brian Amos and Phil Burton who some readers will know from their inspiring talks about the yards and Helen Martinez...
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leaf with reflections on holocaust memorial day
Last month, the museum marked Holocaust Memorial Day. During the week, we shared blogs from our volunteers Susan, Kate and Jessica, all of who felt moved to put their thoughts into writing. In the museum itself, we had a display to mark the day. It presented materials provided by the Holocaust Memorial Trust, to allow our visitors to engage with the history of genocide, to understand the Holocaust and the genocides which have happened since. We also asked them two important questions: How can life go on? And what can we learn from history? In response, staff, volunteers and visitors wrote...
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holocaust memorial day 2017 logo a tree with purple leaves
Blog and poem by Jessica Palmer Holocaust Memorial Day is, in my opinion, one of the most important days in the year and it should be treated in the same way as Remembrance Day. HMD isn’t just about the genocide that took place during World War II, it is also about remembering victims of the other genocides that have happened in Cambodia, Rwanda, Bosnia and Darfur. It is about remembering the huge and incredibly unjust loss of life that has taken place and to serve as a reminder that this should never happen again.27th January is the date chosen for HMD...
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When my Grandpa was a little boy all his parents’ wanted for him was a safe place for him to grow up and get his education. They were living in Russia and as Jews they had been horribly racially abused and persecuted pogroms. Germany between WW1 and WW2 was being run by a liberal government called Weimar and my Great-Grandparents decided that they would live a better life in this artistic and prosperous country. After Hitler came to power, through manipulating this democracy of Weimar, he stirred up anger against the harsh terms imposed on Germany at the end of WW1...
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This blog has been written by Sue Dickson, one of the museum's volunteers.  In the 20th century, thousands of men, women and children died at the hands of Hitler's henchmen for maintaining their neutrality in political and nationalistic issues. These were subjected to either hard labour, torture, medical experiments, death by firing squads or the gas chambers. The triangle was the symbol of identification used within the Nazi concentration camps e.g. Yellow star for Jews, red for political prisoners, purple for Jehovah’s Witnesses, pink for homosexual men and black for the mentally ill or mentally disabled. For this blog I will...
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santa and elf at Erewash stables
  Written by our volunteer Charlie (aka-Santa's elf!)   At the beginning of Queen Victoria’s reign, Christmas was barely celebrated in Britain. By the end however, it was considered to be the most important event of the calendar, with a  focus on traditions and family. Charles Dickens contributed massively to the spread of these traditions through his famous book ‘A Christmas Carol’, a book that influenced how many Victorian families approached the season. It is widely believed that Prince Albert was responsible for the introduction of the Christmas tree. He was born in Germany, where Evergreen trees were traditionally brought into...
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black and white image of fair and church on market place
Blog written by Max Biddulph J. P. Collins and Sons Waltzer De Luxe, Ilkeston Market Place, October 1957.www.picturethepast.org (copyright uncertain As the days shorten and September moves into October, Ilkestonians look forward to Ilkeston Charter Fair which, along with Oxford St Giles and Loughborough Fair, is unique in England as one of our few remaining great street fairs. This year’s event will be held between the 19th and 22 October, 2016, and will celebrate the 764th granting of the Charter by Henry III in 1252. As a young person growing up in the town in the 1960s, my memories of the...
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